first steps from a newbie


#1

I’m still brand new to the world of IVF, and am finally starting to really get going here. I have my consultation with the RE scheduled in two weeks and will hopefully know a bit more then. I do know that my tubes are very damaged due to my Crohns disease, so I am certain IVF will be our path.

I just had AMH checked and it was 1.52 (I am 39 years old).

That’s a decently encouraging first bit of info, right?


#2

[QUOTE=aimeep25]I’m still brand new to the world of IVF, and am finally starting to really get going here. I have my consultation with the RE scheduled in two weeks and will hopefully know a bit more then. I do know that my tubes are very damaged due to my Crohns disease, so I am certain IVF will be our path.

I just had AMH checked and it was 1.52 (I am 39 years old).

That’s a decently encouraging first bit of info, right?[/QUOTE]

Hello Aimeep, and welcome. The process of IVF is often a long and sometimes confusing journey. The forums here are an excellent resource and also support system.

Depending on who you talk to, your AMH isn’t too bad given your age. I know the clinic my wife and I are going through considers 1.6 the cut-off point for low ovarian reserve, but you should still get enough eggs to work with. I’m not sure what you do or don’t know about the process of IVF, so I will give you some tid bits of information.

In the IVF process, you want to be able to produce as many eggs as possible because most of the eggs you fertilize won’t end up being viable. In some tragic cases, none fertilize at all. Once they have been fertilized, you want the embryos to mature as far as they can in the lab since a lot of those embryos will arrest before their fifth day. Even after the fifth day, some could still end up arresting in the uterus. If you have numerous embryos, you can pick and choose the highest quality to implant in your uterus, which means having more eggs increases your chance of success. A poor quality embryo can still turn into a healthy person and a grade a blastocyst may not, but generally higher grade embryos result in higher success.

Also, if you haven’t tested your partner’s sperm yet for sperm quality or other abnormalities, you should do so before you commit to a cycle. While you may know that you have a fertility issue, it’s possible too that your partner also has some kind of male factor infertility. If he does, then there are procedures that can sometimes help mitigate this handicap.

Good luck, and check back to tell us how your journey is progressing!


#3

Thanks for the info. My partner is having his test done a few days before my consult, so we’ll have the information at my appointment when the RE goes over what he believes our chances of success are.

Another question for anyone: there’s a chance for financial reasons we might not be ready to begin until january (our insurance covers absolutely nothing for IVF). Anyone know how much my AMH may drop in that amount of time?


#4

[QUOTE=aimeep25]Thanks for the info. My partner is having his test done a few days before my consult, so we’ll have the information at my appointment when the RE goes over what he believes our chances of success are.

Another question for anyone: there’s a chance for financial reasons we might not be ready to begin until january (our insurance covers absolutely nothing for IVF). Anyone know how much my AMH may drop in that amount of time?[/QUOTE]

Very difficult to know, but I think sooner is always better. You might see a chunk or two shaved off, no change at all, or a considerable decline. That’s the nature of reproduction, though. It’s a race against time. Of course, the irony is that stressing about it is bad for your chances of success. Go figure!


#5

Your AMH sounds great to me. And honestly, while AMH can be a good indicator of response, my doctor always reminds me that “the proof is in the pudding”. I think the bigger concern is your maternal age. I hate bringing that up because I know for some women it’s a touchy subject, but once you hit 35, the doctors treat you as though your ovaries suddenly shrivel up like a raisin. I’m soooo glad I’m having my second child when I’m still 34 so I can avoid all that talk of “advanced maternal age”. It’s ridiculous!! But, something to think about, and something that has been drilled into me since starting this whole adventure. You are definitely at a point where you don’t want to wait too long. But, you also have to be responsible for the sake of you and your family.

As for the AMH, mine dropped from 6.7 in October 2009 to 1.3 in August 2012. That was pretty shocking. My doctor said “you might want to move to IVF faster than you thought”, but said anything over 1.0 was considered okay. We did IVF this past April and are 15 weeks along with a healthy baby. Worked on the first try for us, and had a great response. So, you don’t have to have hugely high numbers…it’s about the quality as much as it is the quantity.

Anyway, best wishes in whatever you decide. I think your AMH looks great and you probably want to pull the trigger when you can, but you gotta do what’s right for you!! Go get 'em :slight_smile:


#6

My AMH was 2.4 last August, just after I turned 38. I had it re-checked about 2 weeks ago and it has dropped to 1.9


#7

It’s funny that Francesca brought up squimishness about age. There are a lot of things Doctors won’t want to tell you because they don’t want you to get pissed off and go to a different clinic. A high body mass index is another thing that they’ll always evade, but curiously, it doesn’t seem to matter as much for women over the age of 35.

I guess the moral of the story is to always do your own research!


#8

Hi, I am new here as well and also having problems with ovarian reserve. However the test I had is different, I had an FSH on the 3rd day of my cycle. Last month it was 15.2 & this month 18. My doctor advised me to move on to IVF with egg donor. But before I do my IVF, I need to have a minor HSC to nip my uterus.
Good luck to you~ I will keep you in my prayers.


#9

Thanks so much everyone! It is helpful to know all this. I’m afraid of my AMH dropping in the six months we may need to wait to start IVF (just because of savings–our insurance won’t cover a thing).

I am definitely not squeamish about the age thing :slight_smile: I know it’s a huge factor, and I am glad my RE has a reputation for being very blunt–no sugar coating needed for me after everything I’ve gone through related to fertility on the path to this decision.

Good luck to all of you! I’m hoping to continue to hear great news from you all!


#10

Hi Aimeep, hopefully you’ve already been advised about this, but getting pregnant while living with an autoimmune condition is often much harder. I’m living with ulcerative colitis and my road has not been easy (see my sig).

As others have said, your AMH isn’t the issue here – maternal age is. Also, there is a higher chance that your crohns has compromised your egg quality, so keep in mind that you may need quite a few more cycles than the average 39 year old. Hopefully you will get lucky earlier rather than later!

Also, before you start your cycle, insist on full immune testing. It’s very common for us autoimmune gals to have additional undiagnosed autoimmune issues. In my case, it took 5 miscarriages to get testing and find out that I also have anticardiolipin syndrome (also autoimmune). When I did my IVF cycle, I took steroids as well as lovenox to boost my chances and suppress my immune system some.

Best of luck to you!


#11

[QUOTE=Eirlis]

Also, before you start your cycle, insist on full immune testing. It’s very common for us autoimmune gals to have additional undiagnosed autoimmune issues. In my case, it took 5 miscarriages to get testing and find out that I also have anticardiolipin syndrome (also autoimmune). When I did my IVF cycle, I took steroids as well as lovenox to boost my chances and suppress my immune system some.

Best of luck to you![/QUOTE]

Wow, I’ve been on these boards for years and still learn something new every day.

Both of my SILs have autoimmune issues. Both of them also have had some fertility problems…now wondering if that’s related?? Will definitely bring this up and suggest they get tested, thanks for the tip.


#12

Just one more piece of advice, you said you had tube damage due to Crohn’s disease. I’m learning more about hydrosalpinx which can be caused by PID, endometriosis or by adhesions from prior surgeries or diseases such as Crohn’s or ulcerative. hydrosalpinx can send toxic fluid down to the uterus making it Difficult for embryos to implant. If you do have hydrosalpinx, they may recommend removing them to increase your chance of implantation. So this is something to definitely discuss with your doctor. How do you know the tubes are bad? Have you had an HSG to look at your tubes with the dye Or are they just assuming they are bad due to your Crohn’s disease? Good luck!


#13

I know the tubes are bad because of a surgery for my Crohns. My surgeon was removing a piece of my intestine and could visually see the bad damage to them. He put a piece of mesh (whatever the correct term is) around the area to try to prevent further damage, but he noted they were very badly deformed and damaged.