Is it real to battle PCOS?


#1

Hi, everybody. My name is Emily and I want to share my story with everybody. I think my disease began when I was in my teens. My first periods started when I was 11. Then I had a delay for nearly 6 months. The situation continued during the next 5 years until I was 16. My additional problems were a big weight and abundant hair especially on my legs. It was the first time I consulted the doctor. She told me that I have to lose weight and prescribed oral contraceptives to remove extra hair from my legs. While taking the pills my periods started to be regular and the hair from the legs mostly disappeared but the additional problem was my big weight. It was 96 kilograms and I was 23. I took pills for 2 years and then decided to give up. I didn’t have periods for 5 months. All this time I was depressed and had a sharp tummy ache. Then I consulted a doctor and she prescribed me metformin. I took it for 2 years regularly and reduced my weight to 65 kilograms but this wasn’t the end of my tortures. I started to have serious problems with my pancreas so I quitted taking metformin and started to gain weight. What should I do? I am already 30 and I started to think about a kid. I am afraid that I won’t be able conceive and carry a child. Please help me!!!


#2

Hi, Emily! I am Jan. I have the same problems like you. You haven’t mentioned it in your message but it seems to me that your diagnosis is PCOS. Am I right? Your symptoms are very similar to mine. I was diagnosed with PCOS in 15 years old. My biggest problems at that time were oily skin, acne, grease hair, extra weight and depressed mood. I have consulted lots gynecologists and nearly all of them said that loosing extra weight is the main key to success. I have also taken metformin and it has helped me to become slimmer but you won’t succeed only by taking pills. You have to lead a healthy life style. What do you eat? Do you work out regularly? If you are careful with what you eat you won’t make additional problems.

P.S. I don’t think that oral contraceptives are really effective.


#3

Hi, Jan! Thanks for your message. Yes, I know that healthy lifestyle is able to help me to reduce my weight. But it’s so difficult because I often feel very hungry and I like sweets very much. I can’t spend a day without eating something sweet. I know that the key problem is extra insulin in my blood.
I agree with you that oral contraceptives aren’t effective either because they do make periods start but lots of these medicines have quite a lot of complications like weight grow and problems with your liver. You have to consult a very good doctor to choose medicines that will suit you perfectly.


#4

Emily, I think, you really have to be attentive with your eating habits because sweets only make you gain your weight. It means you your disease may become more difficult to cure. If you are hungry you can grab something like vegetables or cottage cheese instead of chocolate or biscuits. Some more tips about healthy dieting. Don’t eat too much potatoes and rice. These products are able to raise an insulin level in your blood and then transform it in extra fat. You have to choose products with low glycemic index. You can grab something like green vegetables, buckwheat, lean diary and meat in case you are really hungry.


#5

Jan, thanks for your advice! It seems you really know much about healthy dietingJ. Well done! I tried to practice dieting several times and I really reduced my weight for a couple of kilograms but then they returned with some extra bonuses. In addition, it took me nearly 1 month to reduce my weight for 1 kilogram and all this time I ate only lean products. The effect came only when I started to take metformin and combined it with dieting.
Can you share your experience in treating PCOS? Did you really succeed?


#6

Emily, I think, you really have to be attentive with your eating habits because sweets only make you gain your weight. It means you your disease may become more difficult to cure. If you are hungry you can grab something like vegetables or cottage cheese instead of chocolate or biscuits. Some more tips about healthy dieting. Don’t eat too much potatoes and rice. These products are able to raise an insulin level in your blood and then transform it in extra fat. You have to choose products with low glycemic index. You can grab something like green vegetables, buckwheat, lean diary and meat in case you are really hungry.


#7

Jan, thanks for your advice! It seems you really know much about healthy dietingJ. Well done! I tried to practice dieting several times and I really reduced my weight for a couple of kilograms but then they returned with some extra bonuses. In addition, it took me nearly 1 month to reduce my weight for 1 kilogram and all this time I ate only lean products. The effect came only when I started to take metformin and combined it with dieting.
Can you share your experience in treating PCOS? Did you really succeed?


#8

My health improved greatly after I reduced my weight. In addition, my periods started to be regular and up to know I haven’t had any delays. I don’t take any hormonal drugs but I can’t conceive a baby either. It’s a big problem for me because I am married and my husband and I dream about having a child. He knows about my disease and doesn’t blame me but I see that the idea that we won’t have a child makes both of us really frustrated.
I know that we should consult a doctor but I am really afraid of doing it. What should I do if he says that I am infertile? My family will be ruined then!!!


#9

Hi, girls. My name is Ann. I have the same problems like you either. I was diagnosed with PCOS when I was 19. I didn’t have problems with my weight. Since my early childhood I used to be too slim. But extra hair on my breast and my legs were really a big problem for me. Moreover, there were problems with my periods. They were too irregular and painful. I consulted a doctor and he prescribed me hormone drugs to take for a long period of time. I followed my doctor’s advice and it really helped me.
The same situation was with my first pregnancy. I got married when I was 25 and for nearly 2 years we were TCC. I consulted my doctor for the second time and he prescribed me another hormone medicine and it really worked. Now I am 32 and I have a 4 year old princess. I am really happy about this.
Emily and Jan, I have read your messages very attentively and I should say, both of you need to consult the doctor. Don’t delay your visit. All you need is make necessary tests and then the doctors will select you appropriate treatment.
I really wish you good luck, girls!


#10

Hi, Ann! Nice to meet you! I am really glad for you and your family!!! You have fought your PCOS and it’s really great!!! As far as I know, there are lots ways to treat PCOS and taking hormone drugs or metformin are just one of them. Unfortunately, they don’t suit everybody and from my case history I understand that neither metformin nor oral contraceptives can help me to conceive my baby. Of course, I am not a doctor and I will certainly consult a specialist as soon as possible. But I just want to get maximum information about PCOS and ways of treating it. I have heard that if hormone drugs don’t help that the doctor can offer you stimulation of ovulation or surgery. What are the pros and cons of these methods? Are they really effective? Maybe, you have heard about other methods of PCOS treatment. Please, share your knowledge with me because I really feel trapped in my problem.


#11

Hello, girls! I am Kate and my diagnosis is PCOS too. I have been suffering from infertility for nearly 5 years and here is my life experience. The first time I heard about PCOS was at my regular gynecological checkup. My attentive doctor asked me about my periods and when he heard that I haven’t had any periods for nearly 3 months, he proposed me to pass several tests including hormone tests and ultrasound investigation. In addition, I was a little bit overweight and had acne at that time. My doctor prescribed me hormone drugs. My condition improved greatly, but everything was OK only while I was taking the medicine. I have met a nice guy and we started to dream about the baby. My doctor advised me to give up taking my medicine, but I didn’t get pregnant. Then he proposed to pass the procedure of ovulation stimulation. The main idea of this procedure is to take necessary treatment at certain moments of your menstrual circle. In my case, I started to take a certain drug on the fifth day of my circle and lasted for 5 days. I had to take one pill twice a day. In addition, I had to pass ultrasound investigation on the 11th an 16th days of the circle. Then my gynecologist prescribed me to make an injection of chronic gonadotropin and have sex on that and next day. I had to pass an additional ultrasound investigation on the 19th day and again take pills for 14 days. At the end of the procedure I made two tests (the first was done on the last day before my periods and the second on the 10th day of a new circle). Unfortunately, both tests were negative. I love my doctor. He is so sympathetic and kind. He cheered me up and proposed to pass another procedure in a short period of time. But I don’t think that it’s a right idea because I didn’t feel good after this procedure. Maybe, I should try something else?


#12

Kate, stimulation of ovulation isn’t the only way out! You have written a lot about the procedure but what about the tests. Have you passed hysterosalpingography? And what about your boyfriend’s semen test? You haven’t mentioned about them in your message. I mean, maybe, ovulation stimulation isn’t an appropriate method of treatment for you.
Haven’t you heard anything about laparascopy? Though it’s a kind of surgery, you won’t have any scars after it. And the recovery time lasts only for several days. Laparascopy is made to help your follicles grow and ovule come from one of them.
I had two friends of mine who have passed through this procedure and they succeeded to become pregnant, carry and deliver healthy children. I think it’s better than to take loads of pills, don’t you think. In addition, the doctors had a nice opportunity to examine the condition of your womb and ovary from inside.
With this operation your chances to conceive may really grow.


#13

Jan, of course, I have made all that tests before my ovulation stimulation and the results were really good. So my boyfriend and I believed that we would really succeed, but, unfortunately, the ovulation didn’t give any results. As for laparascopy, I consider it a nice variant but it doesn’t guarantee a total success. I have recently read about another method called IVF. I think it will give me more chances than stimulation and surgery. The oocytes will be taken from my ovary and then a ready foetus will be placed into my womb. I think it will give me more chances to become mother.


#14

Kate, IVF seems to be more effective than laparascopy and stimulation. But stimulation and IVF are a little bit similar, don’t you think. In addition, both of these procedures aren’t totally safe for your health because your ovaries may be over stimulated. It may cause additional problems. PCOS is a very specific disease. There are quite lot methods of treating it but you never know which one may suit exactly you. You can also try metformin. It’s not as aggressive as stimulation.


#15

Yes, and I can give a try to it, but while I had stimulation the doctor told me that I had ovulation but oocytes weren’t realized. It may mean that my oocytes aren’t of good quality and I have read about such method as oocytes donation. It means that another woman will donate her oocytes. Then they will be fertilized by the semen of my husband. A foetus will be placed into my womb and in such a way I will become pregnant. Genetically, it won’t be my baby, but his or her father will still be my husband. What do you think about it? Maybe, there is someone who can share her experience.


#16

Kate, I quite understand you. I have been treating PCOS for a long period of time and while I was taking the medicine everything was OK. But after the ending of a treating course the problems returned very quickly. I don’t believe in wonders. I have started this forum to clarify what kinds of treatment we have and I want to choose the one to suit me perfectly. I am a practical person and I am able to analyze the condition of my health. It’s not an ideal one. I can’t be 100% sure that stimulation, IVF or laparascopy won’t help me. May be, I will conceive a baby after having experienced one of them. But I do know that my pancreas is too weak for taking medicine and time passes too quickly for me. I am 30 and next I will be 32…33…34. Stimulation, IVF and even laparascopy need time. And for me time is really precious. I want to have more opportunities to take care of my child than to spend in clinics waiting for a schedule medical procedure.


#17

Emily, I am sorry that you experience all this!!! You seem a nice person, but why don’t you give a chance to your ovaries. I have read somewhere that the reduction in weight may contribute to women fertility. Once you have reduced your weight to 65 kg, so what are you waiting for? Try to reduce it again and, may be, you will succeed.
As for oocytes donation, I am totally against this procedure because the baby won’t be genetically mine. It’s like as if my husband will cheat me with someone and then will bring a baby to our house. Maybe, I am wrong, but I can’t accept it.


#18

Jan, oocytes donation is only one of the methods of treating infertility and nothing more. For me, it’s the greatest innovation of medical science because it helps infertile women to become mothers. Of course, there isn’t 100% guarantee that after this procedure you will succeed but its percentage of success is really high comparing with others methods of treatment. In addition, it’s the last chance to get a baby before adopting. Though the oocyte won’t be mine the doctors will choose a donor who maximally resembles me. She will have the same color of skin and hair, similar form of the nose and face. In addition, I know that PCOS can be gained genetically. It means, even if I have a child, my disease will be transferred to my children or even grandchildren. A woman who wants to become a donor has to be genetically healthy. In addition, the father of the child will be my husband and I am sure it will be better than if we adopt a child or try surrogacy.


#19

Emily, I quite agree with you. PCOS has various methods of treatment and it’s really cool because you have more opportunities to conceive a baby. All of them have their pluses and minuses. I think it will be great if we, ladies, have a chance to choose the one by ourselves. Of course, we aren’t doctors and don’t have enough knowledge but I feel that ovulation stimulation won’t work with me. Moreover, I have already experienced one and it wasn’t quite easy for my health. I just don’t want to lose time either. I have a good doctor but I know that he will offer me to experience stimulation once more. I want to have more control over my treatment.


#20

Kate, you do have this control. If you don’t want to stimulate your ovaries any more, tell your doctor about it. He just gives you a piece of his advice and you decide what to do or not to do. Ask him to explain you why you should have ovary stimulation instead of laparascopy, for example. As I can see, you have decided to take some radical methods of treatment, but don’t rush with all these. Give your ovaries some time. You may conceive a baby after taking metformin, for example. oocytes donation is a very specific procedures. You have to think everything thoroughly before taking it.