IVF article "More not always better"


#1

AP News story this week:
More not always better with in vitro fertilization - Yahoo! News


#2

my ET is monday for my second cycle…so that is encouraging! :o)


#3

The article could easily be misunderstood.

It says “New research found that about 1 in 3 women had a baby the first time they tried a test tube embryo, and that improved to nearly 1 in 2 with a second try.”

That does [U]not[/U] mean the chance is 1/3 in the first cycle and then 1/2 in the second cycle.

It means the chance is 1/3 with one cycle. It’s 1/2 with two cycles. These are cumulative rates per patient, not per cycle rates.


#4

This is quite depressing for someone like me, who is on try #4! Wish I had not read the article!


#5

I work with 3 women that conceived and had healthy babies from their 4th round of IVF! 2 of them had boy/girl twins :slight_smile: I give all of you so much credit for your perserverence.


#6

[B]snagel[/B] With the higher number of attempts–people still had a 50% success rate. Don’t be discouraged! According to them, more attempts doesn’t significantly [I]increase[/I] success rate–it DOES NOT mean people are not successful with more attempts.


#7

My RE always said each cycle is 50/50.


#8

The article says 1 attempt gave a 36% chance of success, 2 attempts gave a 48%, and 3 attempts increased it only a little bit, to 53%. That means the third attempt only added another 5% to the overall chance of success. Not much. Seems like a fourth attempt would add even less.

Sounds pretty discouraging to me.


#9

I do know people who’ve gone well beyond three cycles before they had success. I had one friend who got pregnant with her daughter via her seventh round (not sure if those were all fresh or if that includes some FETs) and another whose son is the result of nine IVF cycles. I know that they’re outliers, but it does happen.


#10

I did read this article, and have seen articles saying the opposite to be true. that after 6 cycles, 86% of people would have a child. (Not just pregnancy.) I think it’s hard to compare people as a group, as I think individual cases differ. If I hadn’t had an ectopic last cycle, for example, I would be a successful pregnancy. So, technically I have had IVF success but no live birth. Also, if you have had cancellations and such, I am not sure where it fits in.

I do think each cycle’s chance of success is between you and your RE. But if you do get to 4 cycles or more, it may be worth thinking about in an individual case, whether it’s a law of diminishing returns.

As someone who works in research, you have to take it with a grain of salt. But, I do think it’s important after 3 cycles of IVF + to talk with your RE re: chances of success and you have to make a decision with what might make you comfortable. I think with enough money, time, patience, many things are possible.


#11

I think that the article is a bit too simplistic and fails to take into account the numerous variables in any given IVF cycle. Personally, I think IVF is a lot of trial and error and a bit of luck. REs will pick the protocol with the highest possibility of success based on you and your partner’s test results. However, there is so much that can be gleaned from a failed IVF cycle…how do you respond to the drugs, do your eggs fertilize without ICSI, do your embryos survive to blast? Based on these findings, hopefully the protocol is “tweaked” resulting in greater success. Some women have multiple failed cycles, switch REs and wind up pregnant. For some, IVF will shed light on a problem that went undiagnosed before. It would be interesting to know the age of the subjects and their diagnosed fertility issues and whether or not they switched MDs or protocols.

Oh, and did anyone read the comments following the article? Brutal. :grr:


#12

[quote=jenna356]I think that the article is a bit too simplistic and fails to take into account the numerous variables in any given IVF cycle. Personally, I think IVF is a lot of trial and error and a bit of luck. REs will pick the protocol with the highest possibility of success based on you and your partner’s test results. However, there is so much that can be gleaned from a failed IVF cycle…how do you respond to the drugs, do your eggs fertilize without ICSI, do your embryos survive to blast? Based on these findings, hopefully the protocol is “tweaked” resulting in greater success. Some women have multiple failed cycles, switch REs and wind up pregnant. For some, IVF will shed light on a problem that went undiagnosed before. It would be interesting to know the age of the subjects and their diagnosed fertility issues and whether or not they switched MDs or protocols.

Oh, and did anyone read the comments following the article? Brutal. :grr:[/quote]

I just read the comments, and holy moly, some people re just mean (maybe ignorant is a better word)! Wow!! They clearly just don’t understand!


#13

I would like to see the methodology. For example, for calculating percent of those who were successful on fifth try, do they only use those who tried five or more times, or do they include those who gave up after three or four into the base, too. Looks like the might include everyone, since they calc cumulative percentages. I work in Analytics, and a lot of unintentional screw ups happen in analyses like this.

P. S. I found that yahoo comment sections are dominated by true nasty idiots, which is true for any article or topic.


#14

I’d love to see stats separated out by age and fsh/egg quality… does anyone have those? I mean, I would think a 20-something with 2 good ET would have a better chance than a 40-something with poor quality eggs…