Medications for infertility - and what works best for you!


#1

What medications have you found that worked great for you?


#2

Hi Hannah. I think the right meds depend on a lot of factors, but follistim worked for me.


#3

Meds combined with dr’s recommendations. Strictly this way. We aren’t experts here to cure ourselves. The only trick I played was with supplements and vitamins. I believe right dosage is also vital for treatments success. Though it might be stated not at once. Some women need more than one shot to get amounts right. Hope you’re well and heathy.


#4

Although a woman may need just one or two therapies to restore fertility, it’s possible that several different types of treatment may be needed before she’s able to conceive. Stimulating ovulation with fertility drugs. Fertility drugs are the main treatment for women who are infertile due to ovulation disorders. These medications regulate or induce ovulation. Talk with your doctor about fertility drug options including the benefits and risks of each type. During IUI, healthy sperm are placed directly in the uterus around the time the woman’s ovary releases one or more eggs to be fertilized. Depending on the reasons for infertility, the timing of IUI can be coordinated with your normal cycle or with fertility medications. Surgery to restore fertility. Uterine problems such as endometrial polyps, a uterine septum or intrauterine scar tissue can be treated with hysteroscopic surgery. For me I went for surrogacy in Bio tex. The results were impressive and I am now a proud mother.


#5

Well this might be the list of meds used like:
Bravelle (follicle stimulating hormone)
Cetrotide (gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist)
Clomid
Crinone (progesterone)
Dostinex (prolactin reducing)
Femara (Letrozole)
Fertinex (follicle stimulating hormone)
But this all depends on one’s case and diagnosis. Some women need to combine these drugs. Women undergoing IVF, for example, also take types of fertility meds to prepare the lining of the uterus for pregnancy and to prevent the ovaries from releasing eggs early. For instance, women with pcos generally respond well to clomiphene. But those who don’t may be given metformin to help them ovulate. Some women with PCOS respond well to a combination of metformin and clomiphene though. It’s known many of these drugs have been used safely and successfully for more than 40 years.