PGD testing on donor embryos?


#1

Maybe someone can help me. My signature below shows all we have been through on this long journey. We transferred in August with our first Donor Embryo from our clinic. I got pregnant, with what looked like more than 1. As my u/s progressed, by week 6 we saw one sac for sure and a bleed. I was bleeding off and on and was put on bedrest. I was doing well, feeling more pregnant than ever before, and by week 7 I felt like the baby was a few days behind. My RE’s u/s machine is older and not as clear so I was hoping that was the issue. By week 8, I was still measuring a few days behind and we couldn’t find the heartbeat. We went to a fetal diagnostic center and there wasn’t a heartbeat, but a clear picture of the baby. We decided to do a D&C to end this quickly and have testing done. I have felt weak and broken and hopeless. We got the results back yesterday and found out it was a female with Trisomy 7. I know now my body didn’t let me down but did what it was supposed to, thankfully. I have feelings of hope again and think we will try again after a break. My question is, has anyone used donor embryos from their clinic and done PGD testing on them? My RE was a frontrunner in doing this research so I know they do it all the time. I just don’t know if when taking the best matches the clinic has to offer, does it make sense to use the PGD testing? I haven’t met with him as I am waiting for my HCG to come down before we meet. I just don’t know much about it but after this experience, is it worth it? Any insight would be greatly appreciated. I just can’t find much on the internet about PGD testing on donor embryos. My clinic has all of the information on where they came from since they were patients with them, but I know there are risks with accepting them.

Thanks so much!


#2

We’re doing it (CCS testing at CCRM). It costs about the same as a single failed FET cycle, once you factor in the cost of traveling to the clinic, so it makes sense to us if it helps us avoid one (or more!!) failed FET’s.


#3

Thanks for the responses. Here is the situation we were presented with and will most likely be presented with again. Our clinic has donated embryos from people who are done building their families. We had general information on most, and detailed information on the donors. After we ran out of embryos from our donor cycle they of offered to match us up with what they had available. We basically ended up to choosing from 3 different people to get enough to out in. Two were from couples who used donor eggs, and two were from a 40 year old woman and her husband who had twins. We thought our only option was adoption and it felt like adoption with the chance to carry the baby. Some of the embryos were very old so it was a “crap shoot”. I was hoping that maybe this would make the difference. I’m not sure if there are enough to do testing on, and the fact that they are frozen. I haven’t had that conversation yet. I just know this miscarriage was the worst experience. Knowing it wasn’t my bodies fault I feel hopeful to try again and was looming for your experiences. Thank you for sharing them. If it is possible to do I’m sure we will. I can’t give up just yet. We are both wanting to adopt as well. Being older we would love to have two kids so they have each other after we are gone.


#4

There is some literature that strongly proves that even PDG/CCS testing does NOT guarantee a healthy pregnancy or even higher rates of implantation. It seems counter-intuitive, but it’s been shown in the medical data on multiple studies. Since our donors were 24 and our RE was a solo practice who had to fly someone in to do the testing at the cost of $10,000, we chose not to do it. Plus, that’s kind of where we drew our line in terms of spiritual issues. I don’t think it’s wrong and if the price is reasonable, it might be worth it. But, I personally wouldn’t thaw embryos to test them, freeze them again, then thaw to transfer…that is probably setting yourself up for lower implantation regardless of genetic makeup.

Hope you cycle again soon and will chat with you more over on FB!


#5

Nothing “guarantees” a healthy pregnancy. However, everything I’ve seen says that CCS dramatically increases the likelihood that a healthy embryo will implant and that you won’t have a BFN or miscarriage due to unhealthy embryos. For instance, in this study, 96% of the embryos that were CCS tested as being aneuploid (wrong number of chromosomes) didn’t implant, whereas 41% of the CCS-normal (euploid) ones implanted. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22305103 In other words, if CCS testing tells you embryos A and B are aneuploid, it just saved you a heartbreaking BFN. But I agree that thatwing and refreezing makes no sense in your case–I would never do that anywhere but at a really excellent lab (CCRM, ORM, RMA-NJ…) [QUOTE=lucyddr;n2614690]There is some literature that strongly proves that even PDG/CCS testing does NOT guarantee a healthy pregnancy or even higher rates of implantation. It seems counter-intuitive, but it’s been shown in the medical data on multiple studies. Since our donors were 24 and our RE was a solo practice who had to fly someone in to do the testing at the cost of $10,000, we chose not to do it. Plus, that’s kind of where we drew our line in terms of spiritual issues. I don’t think it’s wrong and if the price is reasonable, it might be worth it. But, I personally wouldn’t thaw embryos to test them, freeze them again, then thaw to transfer…that is probably setting yourself up for lower implantation regardless of genetic makeup. Hope you cycle again soon and will chat with you more over on FB![/QUOTE]


#6

My case doesn’t matter…I’ve had my donor egg/donor sperm (at least one baby) twins and I’m done! BFP will be getting frozen embryos, so that’s why I mentioned it. A lot of the success of PGD/CCS is also embryologist-dependent…so if I really wanted it, I would definitely do it at a lab with great outcomes (like those you mentioned). I guess I should have selected better words…healthy pregnancy wasn’t really what I meant to convey. I’m painfully aware of all of the other factors that play roles…like 69/81 days in the NICU and delayed babies aware (and nothing to do with their genetic makeup).


#7

Thank you so much for all of your feedback. I really appreciate it! It was very helpful.