Risks associated with dads > 35


#1

After reading post after post where doctors tell women that their pregnancy failures are do to AMA alone, I am posting an article from a recent article (but there are many) describing reduced pregnancy rates and increased genetic abnormalities among couples when the MALE partner is over 35. It is not all down to you ladies. Really.

In this day and age it is amazing that such gender bias still exists in Reproductive Medicine. But it does.

I hope this helps some.

“We have been conditioned to think of reproductive age as a female-only concern, but it isn’t. For decades, neonatologists have known about birth defects linked to older fathers: dwarfism, Apert syndrome (a bone disorder that may result in an elongated head), Marfan syndrome (a disorder of the connective tissue that results in weirdly tall, skinny bodies), and cleft palates. But the associations between parental age and birth defects were largely speculative until this year, when researchers in Iceland, using radically more powerful ways of looking at genomes, established that men pass on more de novo—that is, non-inherited and spontaneously occurring—genetic mutations to their children as they get older. In the scientists’ study, published in Nature, they concluded that the number of genetic mutations that can be acquired from a father increases by two every year of his life, and doubles every 16, so that a 36-year-old man is twice as likely as a 20-year-old to bequeath de novo mutations to his children. The Nature study ended by saying that the greater number of older dads could help to explain the 78 percent rise in autism cases over the past decade. Researchers have suspected links between autism and parental age for years. One much-cited study from 2006 argued that the risk of bearing an autistic child jumps from six in 10,000 before a man reaches 30 to 32 in 10,000 when he’s 40—a more than fivefold increase. When he reaches 50, it goes up to 52 in 10,000.”


#2

I previously thought Down Syndrome was also associated with increased paternal age, but I guess that was not validated in this study.